Valleytronics News - Page 1

Researchers observe light emission from intervalley excitons for the first time

Researchers from the University of California, Riverside, has observed light emission intervalley transmissions. The researchers say that this light emission can be used to read valley information from Valleytronics devices in the future.

The researhers observed the phenomenon in monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) - a promising valleytronic material that possesses two valleys with opposite dynamic characteristics in the band structure, and can interact strongly with light.

Read the full story Posted: May 16,2020

Researchers discover the formation of valley domain, potentially expand valleytronics technology

Researchers from Korea's Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) discovered the formation of valley domain, which can expand valleytronics technology.

Formation of valley domain in molybden disulphide (DGIST)

The researchers say that they have solved the stability problem inherent in valley spin in valleytronics devices by discovering the formation of valley domain in 2D molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). The team identified that a valley domain formed in an extreme nano structure can be used to store information in place of spin.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 25,2019

EPFL researchers developed a new to manipulate excitons valleys

Researchers from EPFL's Laboratory of Nanoscale Electronics and Structures (LANES) developed a new way to control the valley properties of excitons and change the polarization of the light they generate.

Excitons, or electron and electron hole pairs, are created when an electron absorbs light and moves into a higher energy band. To research the excitons, the researchers used a material made from tungsten diselenide (WSe2) and molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), and a circular polarized laser that was focused on the film.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 06,2019

Researchers develop a graphene-based topological valley valve

Researchers from Penn State University developed a topological valley valve, which controls electron flow. Using electron "beam splitters", the researchers achieved high-level of electron control.

Using bilayer graphene, the researcher created electron waveguides created by gates defined with extreme precision using state-of-the-art electron beam lithography.By controlling the topology of the waveguides (the valley-momentum locking of the electrons), the researchers can control electron flow.

Read the full story Posted: Dec 12,2018

The US NSF allocates $20-25 million towards material research aimed towards quantum engineering and science

The US National Science Foundation (NSF) has allocated $20-25 million for a new six year program called "Enabling Quantum Leap: Convergent Accelerated Discovery Foundries for Quantum Materials Science, Engineering, and Information" (Q-AMASE-i).

Q-AMASE-i encompasses many clases of materials, includings ones that explore the paradigms or spintronics, hybrid 2D materials - and Valleytronics.

Read the full story Posted: Sep 03,2018